Low-Carbohydrate Diet, animal based, cause an increased risk for coronary artery calcification

Low carb diets (LCDs starting at a young age are associated with an increased risk of subsequent coronary artery calcification (CAC) progression, particularly when animal protein or fat are chosen to replace carbohydrates.

www.ahajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1161/ATVBAHA.120.314838

Mycoplasma (and bacteria in general) as a Cause of Narrowing of the Cardiovascular Valves

Cause of Cardiovascular Calcification

Research shows a connection between the level of valve calcification and the presence of mycoplasma pneumoniae and chlamydia pneumoniae in the affected tissue. The study speculates that the calcification is not an age-related degenerative phenomenon, but rather a reaction to the presence of bacteria.

Culture-negative Endocarditis: Mycoplasma hominis Infection

Presence of mycoplasma and viruses in damaged heart tissue and arteries (but also in normal tissue)

Bacteria in Calcific Aortic Valve Stenosis

What Does a Vegetarian Diet Mean for Cardiovascular Health?

In a 2019 systematic review article published on Frontiers in Nutrition, the link between vegetarian dietary patterns and various cardiovascular outcomes were examined. The aim was to update the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) clinical practice guidelines for nutrition therapy. Several prospective cohort studies were examined and the results considered. Although overall evidence was graded as “very low quality” there were indications that vegetarian dietary patterns are associated with reductions in CHD mortality and incidence but not with CVD and stroke mortality in individuals with and without diabetes.

Souce: Relation of Vegetarian Dietary Patterns With Major Cardiovascular Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies

 

Magnesium to prevent and reverse Aurtic stenosis and calcification in general

the SEM data show that the protein-protein cross-linking bonds are the starting sites of calcification. In addition, substitution of Ca2+ cations by Mg2+ cations leads to the formation of amorphous hydroxyapatite, preventing aortic valve stenosis, which suggests that treatment with magnesium salts may reduce stenosis of aortic valves…
iv.iiarjournals.org/content/28/1/91.full

We observed strong, favorable associations between higher self-reported total (dietary and supplemental) magnesium intake and lower calcification of the coronary arteries…
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3957229/

Studies showed that a calcium to magnesium intake ratio <2.8 is critical for optimal health, supporting a long-held but non–evidence-based recommendation that the calcium to magnesium ratio should be close to 2. Increasing calcium intakes in the United States since 1977 have resulted in a calcium to magnesium ratio >3.0 since 2000, coinciding with increasing rates of T2D and colorectal cancer. US studies assessing oral magnesium therapy or dietary magnesium intakes showed beneficial effects of dietary magnesium in CVD, T2D, and cancers, although similar studies in populations with lower calcium to magnesium ratios (≥1.7) reported the opposite…
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4717874/

 

Vitamin D

#q
How much sun exposure is needed for vit D instead of supplements?

answer from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vitamin-d-from-sun#time-of-day

At noon, the sun is at its highest point, and its UVB rays are most intense. That means you need less time in the sun to make sufficient vitamin D (5Trusted Source).

Many studies also show that the body is most efficient at making vitamin D at noon (6Trusted Source7Trusted Source).

For example, in the UK, 13 minutes of midday sunlight exposure during summer three times per week is enough to maintain healthy levels among Caucasian adults (5Trusted Source).

Another study found that 30 minutes of midday summer sun exposure in Oslo, Norway was equivalent to consuming 10,000–20,000 IU of vitamin D (8Trusted Source).

The commonly recommended daily dose of vitamin D is 600 IU (15 mcg) (3).

does vit D cause calcification of arteries?
according to one articles, it could in some settings, not clear when, many other sources point out the benefits of vit d
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5986531/

Vitamin D is critical for brain health…