Review: The Role of Dietary Fat in Treatment of Brain Diseases

A review published in the Current Neuropharmacology journal in 2018 looked at the impact of dietary fats on brain function. It also examined gut-brain communication through microbiota; the impact of probiotics and prebiotics on brain functions; SCFA’s, microbiota, and neuroinflammation. It reviewed lipid sensing, satiety, and processing of hedonic food; the impact of diet on the hypo-thalamic control of reproduction; neuroprotective effects of N-3 PUFAs; dietary PUFAs, brain PUFAs and the role of PUFAs. The results of this review revealed that dietary fats are both friends and foes for brain functions. However, dietary manipulation for the treatment of brain disorders is not just a promise for the future, but a reality. In fact, the clinical relevance of the manipulation of dietary lipids, as for KDs, is well-known and currently in use for the treatment of brain diseases.

Source: Impact of Dietary Fats on Brain Functions
LGIT safe (see 305)

Vitamin D | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

n a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 112 PD patients (mean age, 72 years) on standard PD treatment were supplemented with 1,200 IU/day of vitamin D or a placebo for 12 months. Vitamin D supplementation nearly doubled serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (from mean of 22.5 ng/mL to 41.7 ng/mL) in supplemented subjects and limited the progression of PD, as indicated by a greater proportion of patients who showed no worsening (as assessed by the Hoehn and Yahr stage and the United Parkinson Disease Rating Scale part II) in the supplemented group compared to the placebo group (243). It is not known whether vitamin D insufficiency has a role in the pathogenesis of the disease, but the repletion of vitamin D may provide health benefits that go beyond the prevention and/or the treatment of PD. For example, vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the increased risk of osteoporosis and bone fracture in individuals with neurologic disorders, including PD and multiple sclerosis (244-246). Interestingly, sunlight exposure was found to be associated with improved vitamin D status, higher bone mineral density of the second metacarpal bone, and lower incidence of hip fracture in a prospective study conducted in 324 elderly people with PD (247).

Source: Vitamin D | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

All About mTOR, mTOR Inhibitors and mTOR Activators

SelfHacked published an article by Puya Yazdi, MD in September 2020 about mTOR and natural mTOR inhibitors and activators. mTOR responds to signals from nutrients, growth factors and cellular energy status and controls cell growth and proliferation based on regulating protein syntheses. mTOR is one of those things that’s good to have cycled. Sometimes we want to increase it to grow muscle and improve certain aspects of cognition, while the rest of the time we want to have low levels to increase longevity, decrease the risk of cancer, and reduce inflammation. Too much mTOR activation is associated with many diseases including neurodegeneration. There are mTOR inhibitors mainly used as immunosuppressants to prevent transplant rejection and in anticancer therapy and strategies such as ketogenic diets. mTOR activators include a variety of amino acids and the hormone insulin as well as proteins, excess carbs, Orexin, and more. For health and longevity, we’d want systemic mTOR levels to be low most of the time, with occasional periods of activation. Research suggests it’s preferable to have mTOR more active in your brain and muscles rather than in your fat cells and liver. Exercise is ideal because it does exactly this.

Source: All About mTOR + Natural mTOR Inhibitors & Activators – SelfHacked

Anti cancer diet

Will use Michel Greger and Ronda Patrick video’s as references, corresponding research to back up the claims, shows in the video background or on the website

Reduce meat increase plant-based foods,, especially cruciferous

boost liver enzymes with solphorofane (supplement or broccoli sprouts
see post here

go vegan-Greger on cancer