Rehabilitation of Mitochondria by Lipid Replacement

According to Dr. Garth Nicholson, with prolonged mycoplasma viral infections, the pathogen penetrates cells and causes mitochondrial damage. The phenomenon is typical in a number of chronic diseases (for the infection as a cause of chronic diseases go here), as a result of cancer treatments, and as a result of aging. Declined mitochondrial function causes fatigue and other damage.

For the role of mitochondria in idiopathic Parkinson’s go here, and here.

The above treatment was originally developed for anti-aging.

LRT – Lipid Replacement Therapy

Treatment is by capsules containing lipids needed to repair the mitochondria. Capsules contain a higher concentration of lipids than found in food. The capsules preserve their integrity as they travel through the digestive system. In essence, it is a nutritional supplement.

A short explanation of LRT:

As discussed in the video, it can be assumed that a diet based on unprocessed and uncooked organic food will have good results.

Here is a study showing a significant improvement in mitochondrial function after taking an NT Factor supplement pack for 12 weeks.

NT Factor Contents:

NTFactor® is a nutrient complex that is extracted and prepared using a proprietary process that protects lipids from oxidation. In addition, nutrients, vitamins and probiotic microorganisms are added to the preparation. It contains the following ingredients: Glycophospholipids: polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine, other polyunsaturated phosphatidyl lipids, glycolipids and other lipids such as cardiolipin and sterol lipids. Probiotics: Bifido bacterium, Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus bacillus in a freeze-dried, microencapsulated form with appropriate growth nutrients. Food Supplements, Vitamins and Growth Media: bacterial growth factors to support probiotic growth, including defatted rice bran, arginine, beet root fiber extract, black strap molasses, glycine, magnesium sulfate, para-amino-benzoate, leek extract, pantethine (bifidus growth factor), taurine, garlic extract, calcium borogluconate, artichoke extract, potassium citrate, calcium sulfate, spirulina, bromelain, natural vitamin E, calcium ascorbate, alpha-lipoic acid, oligosaccharides, vitamin B-6, niacinamide, riboflavin, inositol, niacin, calcium pantothenate, thiamin, vitamin B-12, folic acid, chromium picolinate.

Additional Information and Purchase:

NIH Supplement Ingredient Fact Sheets for Professionals and Consumers

The National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements offers a fact sheet giving an overview of each vitamin, mineral, and other dietary supplement ingredients. There are two versions – the version for health professionals and the consumer version. Both versions contain the same listings but the professional fact sheet goes into more detail.

Source: Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) Fact Sheets

Know What’s in the Supplements you Buy

Labdoor buys supplements from retail stores and tests them in chemistry labs then publishes the results with expert reviews. They offer free lab reports with no manufacturer bias. Each supplement is independently tested so that you can be sure of the safety of the products you buy. Find out what’s really in your supplement without false claims. You often see products that are “endorsed by celebs”, claim to be “maximum strength”, or are “recommended by doctors” but have not been tested and are low quality.

Source: Labdoor

Reviews and Ratings for Supplements on ConsumerLab.com

On ConsumerLab.com you can read product reviews of supplements and medicines; learn about health warnings; brands and get answers to your questions about drugs and supplements. The products listed on ConsumerLab.com include vitamins, minerals, herbal supplements, nutrition powders, health bars, and nutrition drinks, tropical oils and creams, health protection devices, health foods, drugs, and health products for pets. Products are categorized by name and also by health condition so you can search for your particular illness or disease to find the relevant supplements and their reviews.

Source: ConsumerLab.com

Is it Safe to Take CoQ10 While Taking Warfarin or Plavix (clopidogrel)?

Question: Does CoQ10 interact with blood thinners? Answer: There are studies with conflicting results on whether CoQ10 may interfere with warfarin treatment or decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). There are studies that suggest that CoQ10 may increase the risk of bleeding when on warfarin and other studies that suggest CoQ10 may decrease the risk of bleeding when on warfarin. Other studies indicate that there is no effect so long as your INR (bleeding time) is stable. It’s not clear whether CoQ10 affects Plavix treatment. Consult with your doctor before taking any supplement or medication.

Source: ConsumerLab Q&A

Use of K₂ and Warfarin During Perioperative Period of Catheter Ablation

A study published in the Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Care in 2016 conducted population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling for retrospective clinical data to investigate the effect of vitamin K2on the anticoagulant activity of warfarin in the perioperative period of catheter ablation. 579 INR values of prothrombin time from 100 patients were analyzed using the nonlinear mixed-effects modeling program NONMEM. A 1-compartment model was adapted to the pharmacokinetics of warfarin and vitamin K2, and the indirect response model was used to investigate the relationship between plasma concentration and the pharmacodynamic response of warfarin and vitamin K2.

The population parameters obtained successfully explained the observed INR values and indicated an increase in sensitivity to warfarin in patients with reduced renal function. Vitamin K2 administration of more than 20 mg caused a slight dose-dependent decrease in INR on the day of catheter ablation and a delayed INR elevation after warfarin re-initiation. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model was successfully built to explain the retrospective INR data during catheter ablation.

Source: Effect of vitamin K2 on the anticoagulant activity of warfarin during the perioperative period of catheter ablation: Population analysis of retrospective clinical data

Could Coenzyme Q10 be Used as a Supplement for PD Patients?

A paper by Robert Alan Bonakdar, MD, and Erminia Guarneri MD, published by aafp.org in 2005 looks at coenzyme Q10 and its use in the treatment of a variety of disorders including PD, plus cardiac, immunologic, and oncologic conditions. Coenzyme Q10 appears to be a safe supplement with minimal side effects and low drug interaction potential. As yet, coenzyme Q10 has not been approved for the treatment of specific diseases in the USA. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter study of 80 patients found that 1,200 mg per day of coenzyme Q10 was associated with up to 44 percent less functional decline in patients with Parkinson’s disease, including activities of daily living. A study of 28 patients with Parkinson’s disease also demonstrated mild symptom improvement with daily oral dosing of 360 mg of coenzyme Q10. These results are awaiting confirmation.

Source: Coenzyme Q10 – American Family Physician

Vitamin K, as a Treatment, and its Interaction with Warfarin

An article published in U.S.Pharmacist in 2012 looks at the emerging role of K2. Recent research has found that vitamin K could be used to treat osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases, and perhaps Alzheimer’s, skin aging, and various cancers. Vitamin K plays a role in regulating the healthy function of calcium and preventing pathologic calcification of the vessels and soft tissues. Vitamin K vitamers include K1 phytonadione; K2 menaquinone, and K3 menadione. The ability to convert vitamin K1 to K2 varies widely between species and breeds of animals. Vitamins K1 and K2 chemically share a common ring-structured nucleus but possess different types of side chains. Humans require dietary preformed vitamin K2 for optimal health, due to its superiority over K1 and for normal clotting of blood. The bones, liver, cartilage, and arterial walls can pull vitamin K from the blood. The current FDA recommendation is for the liver requirement only. Vitamin K antagonists include Warfarin, the blood-thinning drug that inhibits vitamin K-dependent clotting factors. Vitamin K can decrease the blood-thinning effects of warfarin and lower PT or INR value.

Source: The Emerging Role of Vitamin K2

 

What are the Benefits, Side Effects, and Uses of Resveratrol?

A study published in the MDPI journal Biomedicines in 2018 looked at the pros and cons of Resveratrol. Resveratrol has a wide range of beneficial properties; it is cardioprotective, an antioxidant, neuroprotective, has anti-cancer activities, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its hydrophobic nature gives it limited bioavailability resulting from its poor water solubility. Resveratrol has not been found to have any side effects but this may depend on the dosage. Resveratrol can effectively­­­­ help with a number of conditions. Its neuroprotective properties can help with various neurogenerative conditions such as Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s, and PD. Although Resveratrol’s benefits are well documented some studies have shown that it may behave as a pro-oxidizing agent, thus it may also have implications in the pathology of several diseases.

Source: Resveratrol: A Double-Edged Sword in Health Benefits

Can you Take Fish Oil or Krill Oil Supplements with Warfarin Without Significantly Affect  the INR~

A study published in the MDPI journal Nutrients looks at the use of fish oil with warfarin and whether it significantly affects the INR or incidence of adverse events in patients. Warfarin is an anticoagulant often used to manage atrial fibrillation and deep vein thrombosis. However, patients have to be careful about drug interaction with warfarin. Fish and krill oil products are among the many complimentary medicines which have been flagged as having a potential interaction with warfarin. This study assesses the influence of fish and krill oil supplements on warfarin and looks at patients that took warfarin simultaneously with fish or krill oil. The result was that overall, the oils did not significantly alter the efficacy of warfarin.

Source: The Use of Fish Oil with Warfarin Does Not Significantly Affect either the International Normalised Ratio or Incidence of Adverse Events in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and Deep Vein Thrombosis: A Retrospective Study

Megadose Vitamin C – As An Antiviral Treatment

A study published by the NIH Clinical Trials looked at vitamin C infusion as a possible treatment for severe COVID-infected pneumonia. The study was sponsored by ZhiYong Peng of the Zhongnan Hospital. The study hypothesized that vitamin C infusion could improve the prognosis of SARI (Severe acute respiratory infection)patients. 12g vitamin C was infused in the experimental group twice a day for 7 days by the infusion pump with a speed of 12ml/h. Early clinical studies have shown that vitamin C can effectively prevent the cytokine surge caused by sepsis, and neutrophils accumulation in the lungs destroying alveolar capillaries. In addition, vitamin C can help to eliminate alveolar fluid by preventing the activation and accumulation of neutrophils, and reducing alveolar epithelial water channel damage. At the same time, vitamin C can prevent the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps and shorten the duration of the common cold. In a controlled but non-randomized trial, 85% of the 252 students treated experienced a reduction in symptoms in the high-dose vitamin C group (1g / h at the beginning of symptoms for 6h, followed by 3 * 1g / day). Among patients with sepsis and ARDS, patients in the high-dose vitamin group did not show a better prognosis and other clinical outcomes.

Source: Vitamin C Infusion for the Treatment of Severe 2019-nCoV Infected Pneumonia

 

 

Vitamin D | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

n a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 112 PD patients (mean age, 72 years) on standard PD treatment were supplemented with 1,200 IU/day of vitamin D or a placebo for 12 months. Vitamin D supplementation nearly doubled serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration (from mean of 22.5 ng/mL to 41.7 ng/mL) in supplemented subjects and limited the progression of PD, as indicated by a greater proportion of patients who showed no worsening (as assessed by the Hoehn and Yahr stage and the United Parkinson Disease Rating Scale part II) in the supplemented group compared to the placebo group (243). It is not known whether vitamin D insufficiency has a role in the pathogenesis of the disease, but the repletion of vitamin D may provide health benefits that go beyond the prevention and/or the treatment of PD. For example, vitamin D deficiency may contribute to the increased risk of osteoporosis and bone fracture in individuals with neurologic disorders, including PD and multiple sclerosis (244-246). Interestingly, sunlight exposure was found to be associated with improved vitamin D status, higher bone mineral density of the second metacarpal bone, and lower incidence of hip fracture in a prospective study conducted in 324 elderly people with PD (247).

Source: Vitamin D | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

Over-the-counter Vitamin K1-containing Multivitamin Supplements Disrupt Warfarin Anticoagulation in Vitamin K1-depleted Patients. 

Most multivitamin supplements contain far less vitamin K(1) than thought to affect warfarin anticoagulation. Having described 3 patients with multivitamin-warfarin interactions, we hypothesized that vitamin K(1)-depleted patients are sensitive to even small increments. Therefore, we compared the eff …

Source: Over-the-counter Vitamin K1-containing Multivitamin Supplements Disrupt Warfarin Anticoagulation in Vitamin K1-depleted Patients. A Prospective, Controlled Trial – PubMed

Magnesium to prevent and reverse Aurtic stenosis and calcification in general

the SEM data show that the protein-protein cross-linking bonds are the starting sites of calcification. In addition, substitution of Ca2+ cations by Mg2+ cations leads to the formation of amorphous hydroxyapatite, preventing aortic valve stenosis, which suggests that treatment with magnesium salts may reduce stenosis of aortic valves…
iv.iiarjournals.org/content/28/1/91.full

We observed strong, favorable associations between higher self-reported total (dietary and supplemental) magnesium intake and lower calcification of the coronary arteries…
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3957229/

Studies showed that a calcium to magnesium intake ratio <2.8 is critical for optimal health, supporting a long-held but non–evidence-based recommendation that the calcium to magnesium ratio should be close to 2. Increasing calcium intakes in the United States since 1977 have resulted in a calcium to magnesium ratio >3.0 since 2000, coinciding with increasing rates of T2D and colorectal cancer. US studies assessing oral magnesium therapy or dietary magnesium intakes showed beneficial effects of dietary magnesium in CVD, T2D, and cancers, although similar studies in populations with lower calcium to magnesium ratios (≥1.7) reported the opposite…
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4717874/

 

Ketosis and Ketosis Supplements

  •  high-fat, low-carb keto diet. Being in ketosis, the state where your body uses fat instead of glucose for energy, increases the NAD+ to NADH ratio. You want higher NAD+, because it protects cells from oxidative stress[20][21] — an imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants in your body that contributes to aging.[22][23]
  • Practice intermittent fasting. Restricting your eating increases NAD+ levels.[24][25] Though calorie-restriction diets and periods of fasting will do it, those aren’t sustainable for the long term. Intermittent fasting is, if you do it right. Here’s how to get started with intermittent fasting.
  • Take oxaloacetate. A higher ratio of NAD+ to NADH helps you make more energy and makes your cells work better. Oxaloacetate activates the longevity pathway in a similar way that calorie restriction does. It converts to malate, which raises your NAD+ to NADH ratio,[26] which makes more NAD+ available for your cells to use. Try: KetoPrime, a highly bioavailable form of oxaloacetate.

NADD+ and NADH

NADH for PD:

(NADH) has been used as medication in 885 PD patients in an open label trial. About half of the patients received NADH by intravenous infusion, the other part orally by capsules. In about 80% of the patients a beneficial clinical effect was observed

NADH for brain issues
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29634344

older research
pdfs.semanticscholar.org/ed59/9c8a4b6e45592c8da1099103c5797e82f87b.pdf

NAD+ vs NADH
www.elysiumhealth.com/en-us/knowledge/science-101/whats-the-difference-between-nad-and-nadh

NR+?

Most sources say boost  NAD+ using precursors or NAD+ supplement (NMN, NR)

also oxaloacetate :

oxaloacetate. A higher ratio of NAD+ to NADH helps you make more energy and makes your cells work better. Oxaloacetate activates the longevity pathway in a similar way that calorie restriction does. It converts to malate, which raises your NAD+ to NADH ratio,[26] which makes more NAD+ available for your cells to use. Try: KetoPrime, a highly bioavailable form of oxaloacetate

see also https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1474-9726.2009.00527.x

NAD+

Role of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide and Related Precursors as Therapeutic Targets for Age-Related Degenerative Diseases: Rationale, Biochemistry, Pharmacokinetics, and Outcomes

NADH for PD:

short history of NAD related work from 2016, anecdotal evidence suggest its a game changer
measuring NAD is hard to do
precursors taken orally – do they surviv? NADD patched, iv,supossitory…

liposomal NMN ?

all precursors will be tested soon
NAD deficit might be high so that 2x increase in NAD level is not significant